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ILLEGAL TRADE ROUND-UP MAY 2021

28 April 2021

In this round-up: The United States has expressed concern about the impact of illegal HFCs on the export of lower GWP refrigerants to Europe. According to a recent survey conducted by the EFCTC, 52% of respondents see HFCs illegally marketed at least once a month, and EFCTC writes to the Commission about this issue; Supply Chain magazine article about illegal trade in HFCs explains how climate efforts are hampered and why it starts with the supply chain. More information about illegal trade is available at Stop illegal cooling - EFCTC.

In its 2021 report on trade barriers, the United States says it is ready to cooperate with the European Union to curb the black market in HFCs. US stakeholders have expressed concern that insufficient oversight and enforcement of the F-Gas Rule allows for widespread import of HFCs that exceed and are not accounted for under the EU’s quota system. These imports negatively affect US exporters of environmentally friendly alternative refrigerants and undermine stated EU F-Gas Rule environment objectives. See Cooling Post and LaRPF articles.

According to a recent survey conducted by EFCTC 52% of respondents see HFCs illegally marketed at least once a month. When asked what action to take, 59% called for stricter enforcement and sanctions to make the black market less attractive. In response to the problem of trafficking, the EFCTC has written a letter to EU policymakers calling on them to act urgently and asked businesses and individuals to co-sign the letter to be published in mid-May. See LaRFP and Génie Climatique articles.

Supply Chain magazine article about illegal trade in HFCs explains how climate efforts are hampered and why it starts with the supply chain. It explains that by allowing illegal imports in their supply chains, businesses finance organised crime, risk reputational consequences and slow down Europe’s green transition. Funding the illegal market in HFCs means it will be more difficult to invest in R&D to introduce equally efficient, low GWP alternatives. Read the complete Supply Chain article.

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